LawTech.Asia

Asia's Leading Law & Technology Review

The Insufficiency of Singapore’s Amended Copyright Act: A Proposed Shift Towards a Balanced Creator-User Rights Regime in the Social Media Era

Reading time: 15 minutes

We’re all law and tech scholars now, says every law and tech sceptic. That is only half-right. Law and technology is about law, but it is also about technology. This is not obvious in many so-called law and technology pieces which tend to focus exclusively on the law. No doubt this draws on what Judge Easterbrook famously said about three decades ago, to paraphrase: “lawyers will never fully understand tech so we might as well not try”.

In open defiance of this narrative, LawTech.Asia is proud to announce a collaboration with the Singapore Management University Yong Pung How School of Law’s LAW4032 Law and Technology class. This collaborative special series is a collection featuring selected essays from students of the class. Ranging across a broad range of technology law and policy topics, the collaboration is aimed at encouraging law students to think about where the law is and what it should be vis-a-vis technology.

This piece, written by Ashley Ho, critically examines Singapore’s new Copyright Act. Though it acknowledges the Act’s attempt in striving for a balance of interests between creators and the general public, it posits that ultimately this attempt falls short of the goal. Firstly, this paper argues that there is a need to re-examine the purpose of copyright law in the context of the digital space. This is to be done by questioning whether the justifications behind copyright protection still apply or whether they have become irrelevant in this new digital world. If the answer is the latter, then there is a need to recalibrate this balance of interests. 

As a caveat, this paper does not go so far as to suggest a complete revocation of copyright protection. Instead, it simply suggests for the inclusion of a non-commercial user exception, such as that under Canadian law, to make it a permitted use for users on social media to utilize other users’ content. This exception provides greater certainty than the recently added defence of fair use and aligns with the Legislature’s intent on encouraging the production of creative works. Crucially, the key idea that this paper puts forth is that social media operates and thrives on the free value of content, and this norm of the new world ought not to be governed  by old rules which no longer hold the same relevance. 

Unpacking the Lootbox: Legally Dubious, Ethically Odious

Reading time: 13 minutes

Written by Nigel Ang Teng Xiang

We’re all law and tech scholars now, says every law and tech sceptic. That is only half-right. Law and technology is about law, but it is also about technology. This is not obvious in many so-called law and technology pieces which tend to focus exclusively on the law. No doubt this draws on what Judge Easterbrook famously said about three decades ago, to paraphrase: “lawyers will never fully understand tech so we might as well not try”.

In open defiance of this narrative, LawTech.Asia is proud to announce a collaboration with the Singapore Management University Yong Pung How School of Law’s LAW4032 Law and Technology class. This collaborative special series is a collection featuring selected essays from students of the class. Ranging across a broad range of technology law and policy topics, the collaboration is aimed at encouraging law students to think about where the law is and what it should be vis-a-vis technology.

This piece, written by Nigel Ang, explores current global regulatory measures surrounding loot boxes in video games. Question explored include: What is the problem with lootboxes that the proposed measures are attempting to solve? Who is, or should be liable for these problems? What is the next step for regulators and game developers? To answer these questions, focus will be on the interaction between both legal and non-legal regulatory measures taken, and the quirks and qualities of the technology each seeks to regulate. This includes the content of the games themselves, intermediary platforms that host such content such as app stores, and self-regulation from within the sphere of game development. The cultural and psychological phenomena that underpin the impetus for lootbox regulation will also be discussed.

TechLaw.Fest 2021 Quick Chats: Alexander H. Southwell, Partner, Co-Chair of Privacy, Cybersecurity and Data Innovation Practice Group, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP

Reading time: 5 minutes

By Utsav Rakshit & Ong Chin Ngee | Edited by Wan Ding Yao

TechLaw.Fest 2021 (“TLF”) took place virtually from 22 September to 24 September 2021, becoming the virtual focal point for leading thinkers, leaders and pioneers in law, business, and technology. LawTech.Asia received the exclusive opportunity to interview Alexander Southwell, Partner at global law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP (Gibson Dunn) post his panel discussion titled “That’s the Way the Cookie Crumbles” alongside Charmian Aw (Reed Smith), Steve Satterfield (Facebook) and Michael Kleber (Google). Alexander co-leads Gibson Dunn’s pre-eminent Privacy, Cybersecurity and Data Innovation Practice Group with Ahmed Baladi, Ashlie Beringer and Connell O’Neill, who were also speakers at TechLaw.Fest 2021. The group advises clients in Asia-Pacific, Europe, the Middle East, Latin and North Americas.

While cookies track us, Alexander has been tracking them. We tapped into his knowledge on key issues relating to the evolution of cookies. We also sought his views on tangential topics he specialises in, particularly in the area of data protection, cybersecurity and legal technology and technology law (for which the latter two are key tenets of this year’s TechLaw.Fest!).

LawTech.Asia: Media Partner for TechLaw.Fest 2021!

Reading time: < 1 minute

We are proud to be recognised by the Singapore Academy of Law as an official media partner for TechLaw.Fest 2021!

TechLaw.Fest 2021 (held from 22 September to 24 September) is a signature convention in Singapore that will be the focal point for leading thinkers, leaders and pioneers in law and technology. The key themes for this year’s conference are Legal Operations, Technology of Law, Law of Technology and Access to Justice.

2021’s convention would primarily be conducted online creating an avenue for audiences across the globe to be engaged. Last year’s edition saw a record number of 6,000 participants from more than 100 countries.

Centred around the augmentation of technology application across all sectors, this year’s conference is rooted in the legal and regulatory responses to cybersecurity threats. Additionally, other focal issues encompass intellectual property matters relating to NFTs and the movement away from third-party cookies.

LawTech.Asia will be bringing you regular interviews and shout-outs covering prominent speakers and the topics they will be speaking at TechLaw.Fest. These include Edwin Tong (Second Minister for Law), Shruti Ajitsaria (Allen & Overy) and many more distinguished panellists.

We’re raring to have you join us in exploring the constantly moving intersection of law and technology. Remember to check back on our site regularly to ensure that you get the latest coverage, updates and news about TechLaw.Fest 2021! Also, remember to sign up today – tickets to TechLaw.Fest 2021 are free, but limited in number only!


Asia-Pacific Legal Innovation and Technology Association launches the region’s first community-based legal innovation and technology awards

Reading time: 3 minutes

Today, the Asia-Pacific Legal Innovation and Technology Association (ALITA) launched the ALITA SOLIA Awards 2021, the Asia-Pacific’s first set of community-based legal innovation and technology awards. Powered by industry stalwarts such as Linklaters, the Corporate Legal Operations Consortium (CLOC), Clifford Chance, the Singapore Academy of Law and Prophet.ru, the finals of the Awards will be held on 24 September 2021 – the closing day of TechLaw.Fest 2021.

Page 1 of 23

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén